Sierra snowpack is expected to shrink more than 30%

Sierra snowpack is expected to shrink more than 30% by 2070-2099 even in optimistic scenarios. This has profound implications for California’s ski industry. Ski resorts require a minimum snow depth to begin the ski season, with a typical ski season in California historically (1961-1990) lasting from late November to late June (around 200 days). Under… Read More Sierra snowpack is expected to shrink more than 30%

Western US snowpack is especially vulnerable to climate warming

In the western U.S., Decreases in snowpack, less snowfall, earlier snow melt, more winter rain events, increased peak winter flows, and reduced summer flows have been documented. Western temperatures have increased more at high elevations than at lower ones, meaning that the West’s warming has been concentrated where snow falls and is naturally stored in… Read More Western US snowpack is especially vulnerable to climate warming

Long term declines in mountain snowpack continue: IPCC

Globally, long term declines in mountain snowpack have been observed and are further projected over the past three decades, particularly at lower, warmer elevations.  Increasing air temperature in mountainous regions will raise snow lines and major reductions in snow cover are projected for mid-latitudes in general by the end of this century with lower, warmer… Read More Long term declines in mountain snowpack continue: IPCC

Northern hemisphere snow cover declining 1.3% per decade: UNEP

The average monthly extent of snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere has declined 1.3% per decade, with the greatest losses in the spring and summer, over the last 40 years. In the last 50 years, the U.S. snow season has become 16 days shorter, with peak run off over a week earlier. Source: United Nations… Read More Northern hemisphere snow cover declining 1.3% per decade: UNEP

Low-lying Mt. Baker and Snoqualmie are experiencing accelerated warming

As temperatures in Washington State rise, winter precipitation will include more rain and less snow. Over 40% of the winter recreation in Washington over the last 10 years occurred at low elevation ski areas. Snoqualmie Summit, Mt. Baker, Mt. Spokane, amd 49 Degrees North are most likely to be affected by climate change. The Summit… Read More Low-lying Mt. Baker and Snoqualmie are experiencing accelerated warming

Aspen has been warming 3° F over the past 25 years

Average temperatures in Aspen increasing by 3° F, and the number of frost-free days per year increasing by 20 days (25-year trend). At current greenhouse gas emissions trends, the ski season is likely to continue starting later, ending earlier, and losing snow depth until snowpack finally disappears and ends skiing in Aspen and Park City… Read More Aspen has been warming 3° F over the past 25 years

Low-elevation Pacific Northwest snow is turning to rain

In the Cascades, low-lying areas face the greatest threat because climate warming affects both the precipitation phase and ablation rates at temperatures close to the ice-water phase transition. About 9200km2 of area is at risk of turning from regular snow to regular rain Source: Nolin and Daly (2006). Mapping “At Risk” Snow in the Pacific… Read More Low-elevation Pacific Northwest snow is turning to rain